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A day in the life of a Builder

I'm Christian ——-.

I'm a builder for UrbanEmpire Construction.

I work on residential building sites.

So new homes and renovations.

My dad was a builder and I grew up on building sites with him.

So a typical day is openingup the site and organising the trades and apprentices of what work needs to be completed that day.

They can include installing windows, doing framing, demolition works and keeping thesite clean.

Things I enjoy about the job are working with my hands, working outdoors andit keeps you fit and healthy.

A good builder is someone who's good at problem solving,good with people and well organised.

One of the biggest challenges is just learning allthe different trades that are involved in the process of building a house and howlong things take and how long they should take.

When the job's going well one tradewill follow the other trades.

There's no waiting around for things to be done.

It all flows.

Usually, on a weekly basis, you interact with the client.

You'll walk through the job, showthe client what's been done, and what is going to be done in the coming weeks.

It's veryimportant to keep them in the loop and knowing what's being done on their site.

It's a satisfyingjob because your transforming someone's house into something that they've always dreamedof doing and in a new space that they can enjoy in the future.

It's a great feeling.

Source: Youtube

A Day in the Life of A Luxury Home Builder | Vancouver Luxury Home Builders

[Gary] And then another question I've alwaysbeen curious about is, what's the day in the life of a builder like? [Sandro] What's the day in the life of a builderlike? [Gary] Yeah, what does a builder typicallydo on a regular basis? [Sandro] Get up and drink coffee.

[Gary] Yeah.

[Sandro] Well I mean typically, you know,is getting up and going out looking at, you know, looking at what's going on for the nextday, right? You know all typically have you know, be organizedas far as I'll have my day kind of planned out already that week planned out, and lookingat you know, what aspects of the build that we are on right now, and you know thinkingahead okay who do I need to know, what day do I need this next trades person in, whereare the materials coming from ordering materials, making sure that they are there for the peoplethat are working on the side, and it all just basically almost like a conduct or , orchestratingthat process is making, you know trying to make sure that everybody's kind of lined upproperly and on the job and that's going smoothly.

Making you know, obviously going to the site,and checking it out, and you know I don't mind picking up the hammer once in a whilemyself and doing some, you know some work if I need to do that.

Source: Youtube

029 MQ Benefits of Having a Builder Inspect Your Home

Welcome back to another episode of our Ask the Roofer series, I'm here with Matthew Query from Freedom Home Inspections, really good friend of mine; we've known each other for six seven years?.

Yeah at least!.

A while! Used to be Freedom Construction where you were general contractor.

I actually worked for him doing roofing and stuff like that; that's ancient history, you've been in home inspections, doing that side of the industry.

Yeah!.

And we were talking before, you said you wrote a blog, you posted or you're getting ready to post it, about the benefits of having someone who's experienced in construction look at your home in the inspection process as opposed to somebody who's just a trained inspector but hasn't really been a builder or anything; can you talk about that a little bit?.

Yeah sure! The process of becoming a home inspector, while difficult, is not impossible.

A lot of larger home inspection companies can hire, you know younger guys that are willing to go up and get it, and train those guys for what to look for; but over 12 years of experience I've had in the new construction industry, you see a lot of stuff that you just can't read in a book.

Yeah! Is like working on the back of a restaurant, once you've been back there, you go to a restaurant afterwards and you're like; " I see that, I see that, I see that".

Yeah! You've gotten dirty, you washed the dishes, you've cooked the food, you know the ins and outs of it for sure.

It's interesting because as a builder, working for a couple different companies, of you know, run up to 30 to 35 houses just myself, in multiple different communities, sometimes even in multiple different code jurisdictions.

So with that, not that I wanted to do a bad job, but I didn't have time to spend 3-4 hours in a house because I wouldn't be able to see every house.

And as a builder you're bringing in subcontractors.

Absolutely!.

it could even be a great subcontractor but if they have one guy who's having a bad day or if they have a new guy that's not necessarily good at his job, that can make everybody up the chain look bad and can create some very costing mistakes.

Yeah absolutely! And even as far as like working with different code jurisdictions, the county enforcement officials, great guys but they also have a lot to look at.

And you know they got to get through umpteen different inspections, I think one guy I talked to in just Mecklenburg County had like 40 inspections in one day, he knew he wasn't going to get to it.

But as a builder in new construction, you're really building the house to appease the inspector.

Yeah!.

So, I am a man of integrity, I'm gonna do the right thing always, but you know when a code enforcement official comes in and says he's not going to take a look at your roof trusses because it wouldn't fall back on him if there were a problem, you know there's there's flaws in the system.

But that's where home inspectors come in and they they bring great value, and that's where I bring my construction experience and.

What are some common things you see, and obviously there's thousands of different issues but what are some common things you see that are missed or done incorrectly like consistently?.

Well as far as pre-existing homes, just contractors that come in and do work in areas where they're not going to be viewed as easily, such as: in a crawl space, or in an addict.

One home in particular I felt so bad for the lady, she paid a contractor to come in and completely gut the house; and you know the crawl space was about yay tall and the amount of structural deficiencies I found in that crawlspace was astronomical.

Wow!.

And it's sad because there are people out there that will take advantage of the fact that people aren't going to get into those places but again that's why you pay me the big bucks to go into those.

Yeah! Well you say big bucks but it's not even that expensive.

No it's not, you know, the average inspections is probably 300 – 350 bucks and it takes me, I'll spend 3 hours at the house sometimes, if it's an older home that typically takes longer.

And several more hours writing up the report.

Yeah exactly! It can take three to four hours writing up the report so it's a very beneficial service and very inexpensive service as well.

Yeah! I mean, for the liability and the protection you pay money for your insurance, it's very similar, you're paying to protect your interests protect your home.

We've seen some crazy stuff like that, we've even done roof repairs before, or quoted repairs and obviously we're going to quote "hey this is what you can get away with it possible but it's going to last six months" and then "hey this is how to properly fix something".

We quoted this one lady and I think it was like 750 bucks, it was a whole chimney reflash in a really hard to get to location, like two-and-a-half stories up on a steep roof and it was rough.

Another gentleman came at a later time and quote her, he was like "let me take a look", went up there, did some work, came back down and said "you owe me 250 bucks", and she's like "I didn't even tell you to do the work".

And so we had taken pictures in our inspection like we always do, so we went back and he had just literally taking pieces of metal, caulk the side and caulk the bottom and stuck them on there and step them down, and it leaked the next time it rained.

Oh I bet, yeah!.

And so we were able to show her that "hey this is what it looked like when we were there, and this is what he did and it does you no good".

I know I've called you out when I worked for a previous company, you know I trusted you to come over and make sure that another contractor, that was the original contractor had done it right and the fact of the matter was, they didn't.

Many times they don't!.

Yeah! In one case particular I remember, they made the problem worse.

So it pays to have a company of integrity that's gonna look out for your best interests and not just the, you know the dollar figure to go out and, you know check something out.

I'll come out all day long and do a you know visual inspection tell you what I think, I've been doing that for my friends even before I was making money doing it.

Is just something I'm passionate about, I want to make sure people are protected.

Yeah! we need it in this area too.

We've talked about it before, we have a legitimate revenue stream off of other roofing contractors that do poor work and we have to go back and fix it which it it's a bad situation but we've talked so much about vetting people, back checking them, and I mean we're happy to, we're an open books, like if we do something we want to show you pictures "hey this is what we did, this is why we did it" but there's so many issues you can see.

And you're Charlotte company, like you are in Charlotte, we are in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Or in other places.

Well exactly but like right now we're in Charlotte and they're lots of, especially when you get like hailstorms, big storms, you get storm chasers and that's when you really gotta be careful right? because with all the guys, I've heard stories about them taking money and running.

We've seen, even after Hurricane Matthew which is not too distant past, tons of companies coming in and they're not doing good work at all and it causes problems down the road so.

Why do you think that is? You think they do it, I guess I have an idea, is it because they don't have a relationship.

Lack of integrity!.

Well that, and they don't have a relationship with local crews.

Yeah they don't! A lot of times is the qualifications for doing roof work here, you have a truck and you have a ladder, and you're doing sheet rock yesterday but today you're a roofer so.

I think it's just an all-around lack of care for longevity, legacy, and everybody's playing the short game, "hey we want to go sign this check" and have a commission at the end of the week and go buy a boat, they're not looking at 5, 10, 15 years down the road.

So they'll be here and gone in a year or or less, and they make some money and they're like "oh why is business so hard?" but they're not thinking about down the road so they don't care how their work reflects them they just want to collect that check, that's their whole goal.

I mean it's our goal too is to collect a check but for us, we want to collect a check for the next 20 years, we want to be here with a reputation of "hey we do proper work" and I'm building, were building legacy, were building a company, were providing a good product, we're solving a problem.

So it's just a different mentality, you see the same with builder,s I'm sure you see that with home inspectors; where they just come in, here's my check out list and I'm good to go.

Yeah they're the biggest, one of the things that caused me to want to jump into home inspections, was what I saw as a on the builder side, receiving the home inspection and being really frustrated.

like "I know I'm building a good quality house" and yeah I missed some stuff so I'm grateful for the fact that they found some stuff that I overlooked I'm only human.

Well working with that many houses there's going to be oversight and that's why there's a second layer.

But to come in and be rabble-rouser you know to.

Try to legitimize why they were there!.

Exactly! I don't need to legitimize my place in the world you know, that comes from my heavenly Father so I don't have to worry about that.

But when the inspector comes in and makes you feel bad about your purchase, or worries about it, makes you worry about it.

That's not fair and I don't want to do that, I want to use common sense language, I've obviously got to put disclaimers you know legally because that's just that the world we live in but bottom line is I want to make sure that, you know, my clients know what they're getting, and what's actually really a legitimate issue, and what you really should push back on to get fixed before you go to closing rather than "oh well you know, I saw this on the internet" now I'm gonna put this link in here and scare you about your purchase.

You know we see a lot of signs, and obviously for for roofing inspectors don't get on roofs, but across the board I've seen some reports that the entire report was they take a picture of something and it was copy and pasted "have a licensed contractor inspect this issue", and they didn't really document or call out, they just snap pictures and put just like, he just did the minimum he could and then left.

That did no good for the homeowner, just sike them out "oh man this property is in horrible condition because I need a contractor for every single thing to see what's really going on" so.

Yeah and I put that in my disclaimer at the beginning paragraph of a section and it's almost grayed out, it's like smaller subtext because it's not the important part; is there to cover me in the event something happens or whatever but the big information I don't put in every single section in HVAC, "called an HVAC contractor", "call a plumbing contractor", "call a you know roofing contractor.

I mean you know you gotta call roofing contractor.

I don't know if you knew this but I'm not allowed, per the standards of practice of North and South Carolina, I can't actually do work on a home for 12 months after I've done the inspection, so I have zero, you know.

No conflict of interest.

No conflict of interest, I have zero benefit for calling an item out.

I'm they're legitimately to try to help the client so.

Great! We're gonna put your information here so people can find you.

If you have home inspection questions, I know we hit a very broad kind of, we'll talk about some other stuff in other videos but if you have home inspection questions, please put them in the comments or things you're concerned about or issues.

I can obviously, we can talk about siding, roofing, windows, that kind of stuff but anything outside of that I mean we'll have Matt throw his expertise out there but.

Thanks for watching and we'll see you on the next one.

Source: Youtube

City Of Elmhurst Sees Red Over Family’s Greenhouse

TONIGHT HOW DID THE RUSSIAN HACKERS DO IT? PLUS, CHIP READ IN HAWAII WITH THE PRESIDENT.

THAT IS COMING UP AT 5:30 ON " THE CBS EVENING NEWS.

" A FAMILY FIGHTING TO KEEP GROWING THEIR OWN CROPS IN THEIR BACKYARD.

THE CITY IS DEMANDING THEY TAKE DOWN THE GREENHOUSE.

REPORTER: FOR THIS FAMILY THIS GREENHOUSE IS THEIR PRIDE AND JOY.

THIS IS BABY SPINACH HERE.

YOU CAN SEE GARLIC RUNNING THE LENGTH OF THE BED.

REPORTER: IT GOES UP FIVE MONTHS A YEAR MADE FROM PIPE AND PLASTIC DROP CLOTH MATERIAL THAT KEEPS THE SOIL FROM FREEZING IN THE WINTER.

WE GOT THE IDEA FROM WATCHING VIDEOS AND THOUGHT THE GROWING SEASON IS SHORT IT WOULD BE NICE IF WE COULD GET ANOTHER COUPLE MONTHS.

REPORTER: THE PROBLEM IS THE HOUSE IS IN THE BACKYARD.

THE CITY DOES NOT APPROVE OF IT.

WE SHOWED UP AT HOME AND THERE WAS A YELLOW ORDER ON THE SIDE OF IT FROM THE CITY.

REPORTER: CITY OFFICIALS SAY THE ZONING CODE PROHIBITS THESE STRUCTURES.

THE FAMILY SAYS THE CODE DOES NOT APPLY TO GARDENING.

WE BELIEVE THAT PEOPLE SHOULD HAVE THE RIGHT TO GARDEN IN THEIR BACKYARD.

REPORTER: EVEN THOUGH MOST NEIGHBORS SUPPORT THE STRUCTURE THE CITY HAS ASKED THEM TO TAKE IT DOWN.

IT IS MADDENING.

WE REALLY FEEL LIKE WE ARE DOING SOMETHING GOOD.

WE ENJOY IT.

IT PROVIDES FOOD FOR OUR KIDS.

IT IS OUR PROPERTY.

REPORTER: WE REACHED OUT TO THE CITY AND A SPOKESPERSON SAID THEY WOULD GET BACK TO US BUT THEY HAVE NOT YET.

THE FAMILY IS SCHEDULED TO TAKE THEIR FIGHT TO COURT IN JANUARY.

IT SEEMS TO BE AN ONGOING.

Source: Youtube

The Best Time of Year to Rent an Apartment

What is the best timeof year to find tenants for your rental property? That's today's video.

Let's dive in.

Hey, everyone.

I'm Clayton Morris.

I'm the founderof Morris Invest, and I'm a longtimereal estate investor.

Today I want to talk to youabout the best time of year to find tenants foryour rental property.

Now you think the winterwould be a bad time to find tenants for yourrental property, right? We get that question a lot.

Well, should I be concernedin February or March about getting tenantsfor my property if it's so cold outside? Will people want togo out in the snow to come and see your property? Is August a better time? Is the summertime a better time? The answer is frankly,it doesn't much matter.

Obviously, the holidays could bea little bit of a slow period.

Right around Christmas,people aren't going to want to moveand pack up boxes right during the holidays.

However, right after theholidays, and right before tax time is the besttime to find tenants for your rental properties.

Why? Think about it for a second.

Why would that be? Why would that be? Well, refund checks–refund checks– if that's what you said,then you're absolutely right.

And what we find happens is thatmany people want to front load the amount of rent they can puttowards their rental property.

So a new tenant wants tomove into the property, loves the property,and they know they're in competitionwith another tenant.

This is what happenson our properties we get into– I don'twant to say bidding wars– but we really can take the creamof the crop on our properties.

So the person that'sable to put up five months, sixmonths worth of rent and to move into thisproperty, chances are, they'reprobably going to get picked to rent the property.

And why can they do that? Because the tax man– sothey're going to get money back from the government,typically, and they're going to get a big nicecheck from the government.

And rather than spendingthat money on things they don't need, theywant to front load the amount they canput down on their rent.

And very often, we'll gettenants in March, and April, and frankly, February,because people want to do their taxes earlyso they can get those refund checks– they will put downfive, six, seven, months.

We actually had someone paytheir whole year's rent in one fell swoop thanks totheir refund check.

So the springtimecan be a great time, and the winter timeright after Christmas can be a fantastictime to get tenants into your rental properties.

So don't fear the winter.

Old man winter isnothing to fear when it comes to rental properties.

I'd love to hear yourthoughts about today's video.

You can leave some commentsin the thread below.

You can also subscribeto my channel– the big red button– thebig red Subscribe button.

Just click on it,and join our channel.

We publish videos everyweek– multiple times a week.

And our goal with this channelis to really provide you with fantastic informationon how to become a landlord and learn about creatingpassive income and cash flow in your life throughrental property investing.

There is nothinglike it– nothing– trust me– absolutely nothing.

Go out there.

Become a real estate investor.

And take action.

We'll see on thenext video, everyone.

Source: Youtube

Why Do Tenants Rent Instead of Buy?

Who in the world wouldrent a $40,000 home? Why wouldn't they just buy it? That's today's video.

Let's dive in.

Hey, everybody.

I'm Clayton Morris.

I'm the founderof Morris Invest.

I'm a long-time realestate investor.

And this channel isdevoted to helping you take action, go out thereand become a real estate investor.

And we focus here on the channelabout buy-and-hold real estate, because we want tocreate cash flow– passive income.

That's what this channelis all devoted around.

So today we're going totalk about a question I get a lot from differentpeople, who want to know, why would anyonewant to rent a home in the $40,000, $50,000 range? I mean, those are the typesof houses that I, personally, like to buy as a realestate investor– single family homes in theMidwest part of the country, or in the South,or in Pennsylvania, those types of areas– that then have ayard, a driveway, a three-bedroom, one-bath,two-bedroom, one-bath.

But they're affordable.

They're not San Francisco.

They're not Miami.

You know, they'renot $500,000 homes.

They're $40,000 homes.

Those are my favorite.

And, number one, the returnon investment is super high.

And, number two, it's,you know, affordable.

I am able to get alot of properties.

And I have a lotof great tenants who stay for a longtime in my properties.

But a question I get is, well,who would rent that home? Why wouldn't theyjust buy that house? Why would they rent from you? It's a great question.

We're going to diveinto three key areas as to why they wouldn'twant to own that property.

All right, numberone– the first reason why they wouldn't want to ownthat property– it's mindset, mindset.

They don't– not everyonethinks like you do.

Not everyone thinkslike I do, that, yes, we want to own our home, you know? You might have beenbrought up in a family that lived in a home that wasowned by your parents.

Well, maybe these folks don't.

You know, maybe they don't.

Maybe they weren'traised the same way.

And, therefore, theirmindset around home ownership is simply not the same as yours.

So that's one reason– mindset.

Number two reason whythey wouldn't want to own this property is money– down payment money.

Think about this, right– on a $40,000 home,you're going to have to come down with about20% down, if you're working with a bank.

What is that? That's $8,000.

Now that might not soundlike a lot of money to you.

But to someone who'sworking paycheck to paycheck as a blue-collar employee,works really hard– but they don't have $8,000sitting in the bank in order to make a down payment.

Think about that.

You might think to yourself–well, that's simple.

I'll do that anyday of the week.

Yeah, well, some people can't.

And, therefore, renting makesmore sense to that person.

And the third reason thatthese individuals wouldn't buy a house that's$40,000, $50,000 is because bankssimply won't lend.

That's the bottom line.

Banks don't like lendingon properties that are below $50,000, even $60,000.

It's really hardto find banks that are willing to do thaton a primary residence.

So it can be reallydifficult.

And, especially, if you do have that$8,000 as a down payment, they're going to, obviously,check credit score, verify employment, doall of those things.

And, still, they don'tlike to be in that $40,000, $50,000 range for purchasing,for your primary residence.

I don't know why.

It's the same thing withrental ownership of a property.

If you're trying to buya property like that as a landlord, and youlive 50 miles away, you're also going to run intoroadblocks and headaches trying to work with banks inorder to finance a property that affordably, that cheap.

It just doesn't makethat much money for them, to be honest with you.

They're going to financea $40,000 property? That's peanuts to them.

Why would they do it? To them, it's riskier.

They don't want to be inthe home ownership business, so they don't want to haveto go through a foreclosure, take that property back,and, at $40,000 or $50,000, it just does not makemuch sense to them.

I've talked tobankers about this.

And that's the bottom line.

So those are three reasons– mindset.

They just don't thinkabout home ownership, maybe, the way that you do.

So, you know– and theydon't want to own the home.

Maybe they want to move a lot.

That's what they like to do.

Number two– down payment money.

Simply don't havethat money to do a big down payment on aproperty and own that house.

And three– the banks.

Banks simply won't lendon properties that cheap.

Add them all up, andthere's your answer– it's not that easyto buy those homes.

And, therefore, whyshouldn't we buy them? And why shouldn't wehave them out there– great property forgreat tenants to live in that we own and we createcash flow for ourselves? It's a win-win for everyone.

There you go.

I hope you foundthis video helpful.

We have tons of greatvideos here on the channel.

We have all kinds ofplaylists that you can click on and go seeon how to set up and get private money;how to get started with turn-key real estate; youname it, we've got it here.

And don't forget, ifyou're not a subscriber, click the big subscribebutton right here and become part of ournetwork of investors who are learning andgoing out there and taking action and becoming areal estate investor.

We'll see you nexttime, everyone.

Source: Youtube

How To Sell Utah Home When Out Of State

My name is Tracy Leabo and my house was locatedin South Ogden.

It was a rental for a few years and I just decided I couldn’t holdon to it anymore and I needed help selling it.

I got the help I was looking for! It ended up selling very quickly.

I foundyou guys through my parents.

Basically my parents had sold a property.

They’d hadreally back luck with the prior Realtor.

He’d just drop the ball continuously and they hada hard time with it.

They turned to Joel and Ann and they sold their property so quickly.

I was just as thrilled with the process! I really expected it to be on the market forat least a couple months.

It was shocking! To get a call after three days that therewas an offer on the house, and the offer was good, and it was decent.

It was a huge relief!I wouldn’t have to make a trip up to Utah in order to sell the property or sign documents.

With the emails and the way I was able to sign the documents was just, it was so easy!I was really floored! Being able to contact Ann and Joel at prettymuch any time was great.

Any time I had a question they were very quick to get backand that really helped with the out of state issue.

It was a non-issue.

With the marketing, I love the way my housewas photographed! Everything looked really good.

It looked very pristine.

Facebook, andput it online.

I have no doubt that that’s why it turned around so quickly.

Call Annand Joel right away! They’re on top of their game.

They’ve really got the selling ofhomes down to an art! They did a great job with me.

They did a great job with my parents.

And I think that anybody would benefit from contacting them!.

Source: Youtube